stoptechfeminism:

What is Feminism?

And so we talk we must.” - @shanley

The tech workspace is under attack from the wholly destructive force of feminism. What it seeks is the antithesis of the open and safe work atmosphere we’ve all worked to create within our industry. It aims to divide and conquer, to turn…

"Antifeminists" are the whiniest guys in existence. What a bunch of losers.

(via stoptechfeminism-deactivated201)

Projection is powerful

(Source: sandandglass, via crunkfeministcollective)

"If Edward Snowden is proving one thing, it’s this: in 2013, Planet Earth isn’t big enough to protect the American version of ‘dissidents.’ Instead, it looks ever more like a giant prison with a single implacable policeman, judge, jury, and jailer."

— Tom Engelhardt, "Can Edward Snowden Be Deterred?" (via tomdispatch)

(via nickturse)

mollycrabapple:

ANIMAL is happy to learn that our friend Molly Crabapple just got a book deal from Harper Collins! Pub Lunch announces…

Artist, journalist, and DISCORDIA coauthor Molly Crabapple’s DRAWING BLOOD, an illustrated memoir of her life as an “angry punk kid,” model, fire eater, demimonde portraitist, and visual chronicler of protest movements—and an inspiring look at how art can save us.

She has always been trouble, but recently, Crabapple has emerged as a unique type of artist/illustrator/reporter/social commentator hybrid, with her meticulous, allegorical canvases depicting Occupy and Anonymous movements and Tunisian and Greek social and economic crises, to her courtroom sketches of the trial of Khalid Sheikh Mohammed from Guantanamo Bay.
- ANIMAL New York

mollycrabapple:

ANIMAL is happy to learn that our friend Molly Crabapple just got a book deal from Harper Collins! Pub Lunch announces…

Artist, journalist, and DISCORDIA coauthor Molly Crabapple’s DRAWING BLOOD, an illustrated memoir of her life as an “angry punk kid,” model, fire eater, demimonde portraitist, and visual chronicler of protest movements—and an inspiring look at how art can save us.

She has always been trouble, but recently, Crabapple has emerged as a unique type of artist/illustrator/reporter/social commentator hybrid, with her meticulous, allegorical canvases depicting Occupy and Anonymous movements and Tunisian and Greek social and economic crises, to her courtroom sketches of the trial of Khalid Sheikh Mohammed from Guantanamo Bay.

garysick:

It is usually overlooked, but each time the United States imposes a new 
coercive restriction on Iran, Iran responds by upping the ante on its 
nuclear program. When the US began imposing sanctions on Iran, Iran had 
zero centrifuges turning. Now, after more than a decade of ever-increasing 
sanctions, Iran has some 12,000 centrifuges turning. A new round of 
sanctions at this moment, when serious talks seem to be getting underway 
for the first time in eight months, risks sabotaging the limited progress 
that has been made.

Does History Repeat Itself? – Part 2 – A Drone Base in Saudi Arabia

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Recently the Washington Post revealed, in an article about the confirmation hearings of CIA-director-designate John Brennan, that the US has had a drone aircraft base in Saudi Arabia for approximately two years *. This revelation seems to have passed without discussion in the corporate media, but anyone who has studied the history of Al Qaeda probably finds this disturbing. One of the original motivations for Osama bin Laden’s group was the fact that the US maintained forces in Saudi Arabia. Thus, the existence of a drone base in Saudi Arabia would seem to create a new opportunity for dangerous blowback.

This inspires the question: why does the United States of America seem to be doomed to repeat every error in strategic history? Are we a nation that values novelty over history, and does our foreign policy reflect these values? Or, does it actualy benefit our military industrial complex to continually seed new wars – and is our foreign policy establishment then merely a bunch of defense industry lobbyists? Or is it all so much simpler — are our decision makers so insulated from the effects of failure that they just never learn anything? Allow your mind to marinate in these questions as you read Tom Engelhardt’s latest essay: “Dumb and Dumber: A Secret CIA Drone Base, a Blowback World, and Why Washington Has No Learning Curve”.

* “Brennan nomination exposes criticism on targeted killings and secret Saudi base”, Washington Post, by Greg Miller and Karen DeYoung, Feb 5, 2013.

Does History Repeat Itself?

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Does American military history repeat itself? Is there a similarity between the American war in Vietnam and the American-led NATO occupation of Afghanistan? Both operations are an American or majority-American force occupying a relatively undeveloped nation, and fighting against a locally-based insurgency. In the case of Vietnam the American-led operation failed. In the case of Afghanistan the ISAF appears to be losing.

In both cases, the insurgency has connections in neighboring nations. In both cases, American forces carried out (and are carrying out) secretive attacks on these neighboring nations. In the case of Vietnam, the US carried out a secretive bombing campaign in neighboring, neutral Cambodia. The Cambodian campaign killed unknown thousands of people and empowered the Khmer Rouge. In the case of Afghanistan, the CIA is carrying out a secretive campaign of drone strikes in neighboring Pakistan, attempting to destroy the majority-Pashtun insurgency called the Taliban, an insurgency that does not recognize the border between Pakistan and Afghanistan. This CIA campaign is arguably destabilizing the social structure of Pakistan and turning public opinion sharply against the US. In both cases, American wars metastisize outward.

In The Atlantic, writer Henry Grabar has written about the many similarities between the Vietnam-era bombing campaign in Cambodia, and the current drone campaign in Pakistan *. Mr. Grabar’s article shows that the shape of failing US wars is similar over time. Failing US wars tend to sprawl outward into neighboring lands in an attempt to destroy bases of resupply and eliminate enemy forces taking refuge outside the defined theatre. This “mission creep” is not only dubious from a perspective of international law, it is also strategically dangerous, and disastrous from a humanitarian standpoint.

* “What the U.S. Bombing of Cambodia Tells Us About Obama’s Drone Campaign”, The Atlantic, by Henry Grabar, Feb. 14, 2013.

… As critics wonder what kind of backlash might ensue from drone attacks that kill civilians and terrorize communities, Cambodia provides a telling historical precedent.

Between 1965 and 1973, the U.S. dropped 2.7 million tons of explosives — more than the Allies dropped in the entirety of World War II — on Cambodia, whose population was then smaller than New York City’s. Estimates of the number of people killed begin in the low hundreds of thousands and range up from there, but the truth is that no one has any idea.

The bombing had two primary effects on survivors. First, hundreds of thousands of villagers fled towards the safety of the capital Phnom Penh, de-stabilizing Cambodia’s urban-rural balance. By the end of the war, the country’s delicate food supply system was upended, and the capital was so overcrowded that residents were eating bark off of trees.

Secondly, the attacks radicalized a population that had previously been neutral in the country’s politics. The severity of the advanced air campaign — “I want everything that can fly to go in there and crack the hell out of them,” then-U.S. President Richard Nixon told National Security Adviser Henry Kissinger — fomented immense anger in the Cambodian countryside. Charles Meyer, an aide to the deposed Prince Sihanouk, said that it was “difficult to imagine the intensity of [the peasants’] hatred towards those who are destroying their villages and property.” Journalist Richard Dudman was more precise. “The bombing and the shooting,” he wrote after a period in captivity in the Cambodian jungle, “was radicalizing the people of rural Cambodia and was turning the country into a massive, dedicated, and effective rural base.”

MUUAHAHAHAHA
colaeuphoria:

HUEHUEHUE

MUUAHAHAHAHA

colaeuphoria:

HUEHUEHUE

"The liberal hit on Obama has been that the man won’t fight for what he believes in. The next 43 days will put the lie to that. He’s ready to fight fiercely for his job by doing his damnedest to tamp down any possible embarrassments, any potential October surprises — and he’s enlisted the U.S. government lock, stock, and State Department in that campaign. So if you want a little horse-race entertainment for the next six weeks, skip the Ohio, Colorado, and Virginia polls, don’t worry about the results of the coming debates, or the court tests on restrictive new voting laws. After all, there’s going to be no better show in town than the acrobatic contortions of the Obama crew as they work to keep global disaster off the menu until November 7th."

Tom Engelhardt, October Surprise? | TomDispatch (via nickturse)

(via nickturse)

Eloquent

(Source: johnjlm, via mollycrabapple)